Kainai Government Agreement

Kainai Government Agreement

The comparison means that the government will give the blood tribe about $150 million in compensation for the long-running conflict. The first agreement, which runs until 2051, provides for a regional water transfer line that currently serves Ponoka, Lacombe and other municipalities to the Ermineskin Cree Nation Reserve border and carries water from the Red Deer River. The reserve is located in the Battle River Basin, an area at risk of drought south of Edmonton. The Erminkins urban site has a small water treatment plant; Rural homes are served by cisterns or fountains filled with trucks. The local water tables are not enough to meet the needs of the municipality and their quality has deteriorated considerably over time. While the federal government was trying to erase Aboriginal title before colonization, first nations were trying to make peace with each other, with the government and settlers arriving. The signing of the contract took place at the Blackfoot junction, a place on its territory. This place was a bit of a problem for some of the other nations, because it was quite far from their hunting grounds. The distancing factor led to a discussion on the postponed negotiations for two days. Contract Commissioners David Laird and James Macleod arrived on September 16 with the Siksika, Stoney-Nakoda and Tsuut`ina. [5] They all agreed to wait two days for the arrival of the other nations. Negotiations between the Commissioners and the five nations began on 19 September.

David Laird and James Macleod, who represented the Canadian government, began their negotiating side by pointing out the facts about the declining buffalo population and how he proposed to help the natives by introducing new laws to protect the buffalo. The importance of the buffalo to the natives was high because of their dependence on buffalo for food. David Laird proposed new laws to protect the buffalo, with the help and teaching the natives how to learn more about agriculture and livestock, which would move from addiction to buffalo. [5] David Laird explained to the natives that the buffalo would soon disappear and that it was important for them to settle in agriculture and the livestock lifestyle, and that the government would support them in this task. The leaders of the plains were interested in signing the treaty because they were concerned about the course of their lives. People had realized that their resources were quickly depleted due to hunting and commercializing the use of animals with the Hudson`s Bay Company. Diseases such as smallpox, which claimed the lives of the elderly, young people and children, and it became increasingly difficult to control diseases because they spread easily in communities where there was no immunity to these foreign diseases. The simple ones and their leaders were also concerned about their future and culture and what the influx of American settlers and merchants would mean for their communities.

[2] They saw the number of contracts as an association with the monarchy and as a means for them to obtain government protection of their lands and resources before the American settlers came to retake their territories.