Taungurung Land Use Activity Agreement

Taungurung Land Use Activity Agreement

The LUAA only applies to “public lands” (often referred to as Kronland). In other words, since more claims are completed, the move to the determination and billing phase means that there is a strong focus on the effectiveness of the results provided by the systems. [footnote 142] The focus is on, both at national and federal level, how traditional owner companies can achieve financial independence in order to support their communities, maintain traditional lands and waters, and protect tangible and intangible cultural heritage. It is important to note that, in this context, economic development is not necessarily only about increasing financial well-being, but also about the broader social impact that increases well-being. [footnote 143] A recent study by the Council of Australian Governments on the administration and use of indigenous lands showed that: Figure 2. Timetable for the determination of national ownership and agreements with traditional owners in Victoria In other cases, identifying the extent of this exclusion involves a practical case-by-case assessment of the country and its actual use. Regardless of their use by the public, these properties are not “public land” as defined below. The Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006 still protects the sites on these lands, but the Taungurung Land and Waters Council (TLaWC) has no procedural rights under the LUAA. This exclusion applies to that part of the reserve or other public lands used as a cemetery or crematorium. As already mentioned, at the time of publication, a number of ToS Act recognition and comparison agreements were concluded at different stages of the transaction process. [Footnote 31] The TOS Act facilitates agreements between a traditional Owner group and the Crown (the Victorian government).

The higher agreement is called the Recognition and Concord Agreement (RSA). If the sports facility is located within an existing rental area, all leased land is excluded from the LUAA. This Act, in collaboration with the LUAA, defines the processes that public space managers must follow before dealing with or carrying out work on public lands. These land managers include departments, legal authorities, local governments and management committees. The LUAA does not apply to land covered by certain types of existing infrastructure (see below). With regard to sustainable sustainability, both groups said that there were serious financing problems that put enormous pressure on companies and that the resources made available in the transaction agreements were minimal. Although additional ad hoc funds were released in some circumstances, they found that there were significant difficulties in ensuring that the company would remain able to maintain itself year after year. Both groups have developed active and financially successful business arms: Gunaikurnai Enterprise and Dja Dja Wurrung Enterprises (Djandak). They suggested that local and government governments could be more proactive with these companies through public procurement processes. This could support each company`s financial capacity and its own internal capacity building processes. One group also proposed that a fee for service approach be adopted for future meetings with departments and government authorities, given that pressure is exerted on the company`s small number of employees.

For example, a tennis court or oval is clearly an establishment for organized sports activities. However, it is unlikely that an area uprooted from a bush reserve or forest used for picnics and informal games would be a public leisure facility for organised sports activities. . . .